Wild Goose Qigong 2019 - Year of the Pig

 

Happy New Year!

We’re now 7 days into 2019. Actually, I’m more of a Chinese New Year kind person [February 5th - Year of the Pig]. Somehow it just feels more auspicious. I especially adore the Lantern Festival. Between now and then is that short window of time when we seek self-renewal and reset our inner compass - better health, relationships, productivity etc. All ‘resolutions’ and goals come down to a simple yet complex truth: stop doing what you know is bad for you and do more of what’s good. Change comes from within and requires us to take new action. Otherwise, we keep doing what we've been doing, with the same results. Simple is rarely easy, however. We, humans, are complex beings. Common sense is not always common practice. But what if there was just ONE thing, one new habit, that if followed, could make manifold changes? 

Here’s what I’ve noticed over my 19 years of Wild Goose Qigong practice - especially these...

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Wild Goose Qigong Blog - "A Moving Hinge Never Rusts"

 

“A moving hinge never rusts”

This ancient Chinese adage appears in the biography of the Daoist physician Hua Tuo c. 200. It also appears in this interpretation: “A [wooden] hinge is not eaten by woodworm” and often coupled with the phrase, "Flowing water does not stagnate [go mouldy].” 

The Daoists have a wonderful way of observing natural processes and applying them, either directly or metaphorically, to the human condition. And this quote is probably one of my favourites. 

Movement, like regular Qigong practice, lubricates the joints, moves the blood and Qi, strengthens the bones and soft tissues. Gentle physical exercise can reduce oxidative stress in the brain and body. Physical overexertion, on the other hand, can increase oxidation (‘rusting’). 

The simple advice is: move.

But we can take the image of the hinge a step further: after movement (or transition) there is rest. But rest is not inactive. Rest...

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Grandmaster Yang Mei June on 正 (Uprightness), 准 (Accuracy), 实 (Honesty),

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Rare video of Grand Master Yang Mei June - 27th Generation Inheritor of the Kunlun School of Wild Goose (Da Yan) Qigong. The original footage has been translated and transcribed for you here.


Grandmaster Yang Mei June (1895 - 2002)
27th Generation Inheritor of the Kunlun Dayan Qigong System


Hello Master Yang,

You've been invited here by the Guangdong Qigong Association and the Qigong & Martial Arts Association of Southern Medical University. You travelled here from Wuhan to teach students for our workshop. Can you tell us something about Dayan Qigong? How did it come about?

Dayan Qigong dates back to the Jin Dynasty [266-420 CE]. It originates from the Daoist Kunlun School [Kunlun Mountains]. According to its teaching, Dayan Qigong can only pass down to one person each generation. Now, it has evolved over dozens of generations [28]


When did you start to learn Qigong?
 
I was 13 when I started to learn Qigong. I was the only child in my family. The skill is only...
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Wild Goose Qigong Training Video - 1st 64, #56

 
Wild Goose Qigong Training - 1st 64, #56 "Swooping Over Water7x". Video by Gregg Wagstaff, Senior Instructor for Dayan Qigong Association (UK). Suitable for all Wild Goose Qigong students.
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What do you give a 106-year-old Qigong Grandmaster?

What do you give a 106-year-old Qigong Grandmaster?

That was the question I was asking myself in May of 2002, before my journey to visit Yang Mei June, 27th Generation Grandmaster of the Kunlun Da Yan Qigong System. I wanted to carry with me something from Scotland. But what do you gift to such a woman?

A week later in Beijing I unpacked my rucksack. They had made it through:

A blooming root of purple mountain heather, picked from the summit of a Scottish munroe. Its root wrapped in moist tissue and then again in foil. And a stone. Gneiss. Washed and tumbled by the sea, off the coast of Arbroath, for ages, into a perfect egg shape. Mountain & Sea.

“It’s heavy!” commented Yang Mei June, taking it in her hand. The stone filled her palm. The gneiss - 3 billion years old - predating all life on earth. Her skin so thin, paper-like, transparent, without age spots.

The purple blooming heather made its way into an oversized plant pot. Filled with soil from a nearby...

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The late Grandmaster Yang Mei June (d. 23 July 2002, aged 106)

 

Meeting the Grandmaster...

At 106 years of age, Yang Mei June had to be carried to the dinner table. I sat opposite her. Her body was frail. But her voice and spirit were strong. This diminutive lady – under 5 foot tall - had the most incredible story...

Yang Mei June was born at the end of the Qing dynasty (1644 -1912). She only narrowly survived the Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945) by pretending she was dead, being consequently buried alive and later digging her way out. She later survived persecution during the Cultural Revolution (1966 –1976). What made her survival more crucial, was that Yang Mei June was the 27th Grandmaster of the Da Yan (Wild Goose) Qigong system. She was highly respected in the Qigong and Internal Martial Arts circles.

After the violence of the Cultural Revolution, Yang Mei June decided to go against tradition and open this skill to the public for the well-being of everyone. Students came to her from far and wide, for she, and only she,...

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